Blichmann Quick Connectors, Auto Sparge and Hop Blocker

I know–it looks like this blog is really just a front for Blichmann Engineering’s PR department, but that’s certainly not the case. I’m writing about the things I’m doing right now, and what I’m doing happens to revolve around Blichmann equipment.  I bought a lot of it recently, and I’m still working through the kinks.

In my previous post, I went over my experiences with the Tower of Power.  I specifically didn’t mention the other Blichmann products that I was using because I wanted to talk about them separately.  The Quick Connectors, Auto Sparge, and Hop Blocker are under review today.

Blichmann Quickconnect Washer

There’s nothing particularly complicated about the Quick Connectors.  Each connector comes with the “nut”, which is a standard 1/2″ female NPT connection.  The outside of the nut, however, is rubberized and ridged, making them comfortable to handle even when hot.  No tools are required to screw them on or off–hand tightening is sufficient.  To keep the connections leak-free, there is a rubber o-ring, or washer, on the inside of the nut.  One of the best benefits of thisdesign, in my opinion, is that it has eliminated my need for teflon tape.  No more scraping off the old crap for cleaning!

The rest of the connector is also stainless.  1/2″ and 3/8″ straight hose barbs, 90-degree elbow options, and a 3/8″ male NPT flare are all available.  I bought a half-dozen of the 1/2″ hose barbs and one of the 3/8″ flares.  Prior to this purchase, I had been using connectors bought from the local hardware store.  They did their job, but they required tools, teflon tape, and were made out of brass, none of which were ideal.

The difference was immediately noticeable: The Quick Connectors can be permanently attached to their hoses because they allow the nut to rotate independently of the hose barb.  The whole kit and caboodle can go into the sanitizing solution without having to fish the connectors off the bottom of the bucket or sanitize them in a different container.

The 3/8″ flare is a huge bonus for beer line cleaning.  I can quickly attach the connector to the pump (did I mention without teflon tape?) and equally quickly attach my beer lines for their 15 minute BLC bath.

The Auto Sparge is the Blichmann answer for simplified sparging.  It mounts to the mash tun through a hole drilled just under the rim of the vessel.  A 1/2″ male NPT connection on the outside of the mash tun allows you to connect the hot liquor tank and/or a recirculation from the mash (see my post about the Tower of Power).  On the inside of the mash tun there is a large adjustable float and a silicon outlet tube that runs through another, smaller float.

The large float is fundamentally the same thing as what you find in your toilet tank–it’s a hollow plastic ball attached to a stainless rod and a brass valve.  When the float comes up, the flow from the outside is restricted.  When it comes down, the flow increases.  Used in conjunction with a flow meter, the Auto Sparge can make the sparging process almost completely touchless, as the flow into the mash tun will automatically match the flow going out.

One complaint about this design is that, when combined with the location of the hole it’s mounted to, there are limitations to how low the volume of the mash can be before the Auto Sparge isn’t effective or efficient anymore.  The issue might be mitigated by a longer stainless rod, but I haven’t yet tried that.

The outlet tube has not worked ideally for me, but I’ve been using a 20 gallon mash tun to brew 11 gallon batches of beer.  With a 15 gallon mash tun, it might work perfectly.  As I’ve used it, the flow tends to be too fast and forceful to leave the top of the grain bed undisturbed.  It creates a crater and a tight recirculation flow that doesn’t really disburse the heated liquid efficiently.  I found myself tending to the top of the grain bed to encourage the flow to be more consistent throughout.  Also, the outlet tube has gotten clogged where it’s constricted by the small float that keeps it on top of the grain bed.

The Hop Blocker is not my favorite piece of equipment, but I’ve been using it regularly.  It looks something like a large tin can with large holes drilled into it from the midline-up, and smaller holes from the midline-down.  It also has a stainless steel “wrap” that can slide up and down the unit via a hook that’s exposed as the kettle drains.

Blichmann says the Hop Blocker is made for filtering pellet hops, and its performance is largely dependent upon whirlpooling to isolate hop material and trub in the center of the kettle before you start the runoff.  As the liquid level in the kettle goes down, you slide the wrap up, exposing the smaller holes at the bottom.  I don’t typically use pellets, but when I do I use a filter bag, so this purchase was not necessarily a logical one for me.  My hope was that it would work even better with whole hops, but that hasn’t been the case.

Over the course of a couple of brewing sessions, in addition to the Hop Blocker, I’ve gone back to stuffing a copper or stainless mesh, like a pot scrubber, under the drain tube as a pre-filter.  This method has proven to keep out most of the larger hop material without having to use a full false bottom.

One of the things I like about Blichmann is that they make equipment that is obviously designed for a specific purpose.  They’ve put thought into their designs, whose form follows their function.  I haven’t even mentioned their ball valves, which are stainless and can be fully disassembled for thorough cleaning.  I had no idea how gunky a ball valve could get until I took one apart after a few uses.